12 Asian Recipes That Have No Soy (!!!) but Still Taste Amaze – Greatist


Eating soy-free while craving Chinese are two things that don’t exactly mix. Even soy-free options are risky in the back kitchen, a chance those with allergies can’t be taking. Instead, take matters into your own hands. We’ve rounded up 12 soy-free recipes that definitely rival your favorite Chinese take-out spot. They’ll take you just as long as delivery usually takes on a Sunday night, and chances are, they’re a whole lot healthier for you.

Cashew chicken is always on the top of the list for Chinese takeout because that nutty-sweet combination is pretty unforgettable. But instead of collecting take-out containers, you’ll be surprised how much better it feels to make the staple meal at home instead. This recipe is totally gluten-free too.

We’ve never met a drumstick we didn’t like, but these sweet, sticky, and slightly fiery ones are definitely the crowd-pleaser you’re after. Soy-free eaters can slather as much sauce as they’d like on topit’s made with orange juice, honey, Sriracha, ghee, and coconut aminos (the ideal soy sauce substitute for any gluten-free or Paleo folks).

Pan-searing salmon is always an immediate yes, but give us a glaze this good to dress it in and we’ll never feast our eyes on another recipe again. You’ll need coconut aminos (to keep this soy-free), honey, ginger, garlic, sesame oil, and a splash of vinegar. Did we mention this recipe takes 20 minutes, tops?

We couldn’t think up a better light and airy salad to meal-prep for lunch. Before you get there, you’ll need to grab zucchini and cucumbers (for the noodles) garlic and sesame oil, and then mint and jalapeño to garnish when the time comes to dig in.

When the take-out cravings hit, soy-free eaters will definitely want to pull this recipe out of their back pocket. We were already sold on the sounds of this garlic sauce, but the recipe also only calls for one pan. I’ll do cleanup if you cook?

We love our meals doused in sesame garlic sauce as much as the next person, especially when it’s made this simple. Soy-free folks can now get in on the Chinese restaurant classic too. You’ll need to pick up flank steak, coconut aminos, sesame oil, raw apple cider vinegar, broccoli, fish sauce, ginger, scallions, tapioca, and coconut oil to make the magic happen as many times as you want.

This one is all about that sweet, sweet sauce. On the bill to make it is balsamic vinegar, maple syrup, coconut aminos, and hot sauce all thrown together on the stove to perfection. You’ll be frying up your noodles in a tablespoon of sesame seed oil. Don’t be alarmed by arrowroot flouryou can easily sub it out for tapioca flour, which you can snag at most large retailers like Walmart and Amazon these days.

Making meatballs is always a treat because you can use your hands. You’ll be making some mean turkey ones here, mixed with green onion and a special sauce: honey, sesame oil, coconut aminos, ginger, garlic, and tapioca starch to tie it all together. Throw them over a bed of zoodles and consider dinner made.

A good slaw can do wonders for the dinner table. This one is all about textures (and colors) with a few simple veggies—cabbage, red bell pepper, shredded carrots, and a nice crunch from the toasted cashews. What you won’t find is any soy—just coconut aminos, fish sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger for elevated taste.

You don’t need soy sauce to successfully dunk Asian poppers, and this recipe proves that. These babies are packed with flavor thanks to a simple medley of coconut aminos, garlic, ginger, and red and green onion. To make things even easier when shopping, substitute coconut flour for cassava flour, the gluten-free alternative popping up literally everywhere.

Hoping to impress guests at a dinner party? Look no further than homemade vegan “egg” rolls. We thought we had to leave that to the masters, but this recipe is quick, and the ingredients are accessible. For the wrappers, you can opt for spring roll wraps instead, and your veggie options are endless. Stick to this lineup of green cabbage, carrots, zucchini, basil, and cilantro or shred up your favorites to add to the mix.

Step away from the take-out menu! If you’re soy-free, it’s a tough task to order in without running the risk of a serious belly ache. This healthy take on a traditional fried rice has everything you could wish for from a Chinese restaurant, except it’s somehow low-carb, gluten-free, Whole30, and Paleo-friendly.

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